The Ups and Downs of USCIS

Round OneRound TwoRound ThreeRound FourRound FiveRound Six, Round Seven, Round Eight

Sorry, I couldn’t help but leave with a teaser before. Lots of stuff going on in the AmericaNepali Household behind the scenes…

P and I had hoped to travel to Nepal before the end of 2011.

The debate before we got married was that we wanted to travel for Dashain, thinking it would be really nice to be with P’s grandfather for our first married Dashain and very special to take our first married tikka from him. However with the timeframes of green card applications and travel documents (called “advanced parole” which allows a green card petitioner to travel abroad while an application for permanent residence is still pending), we didn’t think there would be enough time between filing the paperwork after our July wedding, and the festival in early October. The alternative was to have a secret “court marriage” a month or two in advance so we could start the green card paperwork early, and our marriage certificate would reflect a different legal date than when we held the ceremonies with our friends and families. That seemed like too much trouble to travel for a festival, so we laid our plans to rest and figured we would try to travel around Christmas time when I had more time off from work, in the hopes that his immigration paperwork would be settled by then.

But then an unexpected research/presentation opportunity came up for P, and an organization asked him to come to Nepal (and would pay for a ticket!) near the end of September… a week before Dashain.

Immediately I called an immigration attorney colleague (the same who gave me advice about the green card application) and asked how I could expedite P’s advanced parole application. He recommended two thing: move up P’s biometrics appointment (originally scheduled by USCIS for August 29th), and contact our local congressperson to pressure USCIS to speed along the application.

The biometrics (photograph, fingerprint) was the first key, because that triggers the FBI background check on an applicant, and nothing starts on a green card/advanced parole application before that.

We sent P to the Boston USCIS office armed with an invitation letter from the organization in Kathmandu, some airline reservations, and his USCIS notice for his biometrics appointment on Aug 29th. With all these documents the Boston USCIS office allowed him to take his biometrics on Aug 16th, so we could get the ball rolling.

On Aug 19th I contacted my local congressman’s office and was connected with his staffer who works with immigration issues. She asked me to write a cover letter explaining the situation and to send a fax with all of our USCIS receipt notices, his biometrics document with processing stamp, letter of invitation from Nepali organization, and travel itinerary.

For the next three and a half weeks I either called or emailed her office every other day (and eventually every day) to check on the application status, most days with absolutely no response at all. It didn’t help that Hurricane Irene blew through and caused damaged to areas in the Congressman’s district, and a week and a half later remnants of another tropical storm caused flooding in our city (water nearly up to the bottom of my car on my way to work!). She told me at one point that Hurricane Irene was taking up most of their energies that week, which I interpreted as, “You are low priority lady. Your husband will just have to travel at another time.”

Last week I figured it was do-or-die week, and by Friday the only response I had from the congressional liaison was, “Your husband’s application is sitting on a supervisor’s desk at the [USCIS] Missouri Service Center.”

I think it was doubly (triply?) infuriating because I also work with USCIS as part of my international student advisor job, and I just couldn’t FATHAM why this woman couldn’t find out more information. Or maybe I was just frustrated because I knew my fate was in her hands and I couldn’t do anything to change it, and she seemed so “distracted.”

My boss said that USCIS doesn’t like people thinking that congressional intervention helps. I guess it is annoying when congressional representatives start bugging the USCIS processing centers with application expedition requests. I get that. “But,” my boss continued, “P’s application wouldn’t be ‘on a supervisor’s desk’ had you not contacted the congressional liaison. I  think it is a good sign.”

Monday I emailed—no updates.

Tuesday I called—no updates.

By Tuesday night I was finally loosing hope. I actually drafted a long desperate sounding letter to email directly to the congressman–and emailed it too–but my email bounced back since I had the address wrong. There were only ten days left until the proposed departure date. It just didn’t seem possible that his paperwork would come through.

Then Wednesday, mid-morning, I received an email from the congressional staffer I had been harassing for almost a month, “Case MSC______________, Form I-131 was approved on 9/14/11. The applicant should receive their card in 2-3 weeks from USCIS.”

Hallelujah!

I jumped clear out of my seat at work and practically yodeled I was so excited. I called P right away and he, of course, didn’t pick up the phone, so I sent him a google chat.

9:39 AM me: MERRRRR
9:40 AM P: ?
me: IT WAS APPROVED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
P: what?
me: your advanced parole!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
P: how do you know
???
:)
????
9:41 AM me: [congressional staffer] just emailed me!!!!
P: forward the email???
seriously??
can’t believe it
i had lost hope

So now we are buying tickets to go to Nepal next Friday.

Now, if you were following closely, you noticed that the congressional representative said, “document will be mailed in 2-3 weeks.” Yes, this could be a potential logistical hurdle.

Since P has been officially approved for advanced parole he can leave the country without incident, but he will not be able to re-enter unless he has his advanced parole document in hand. We are hoping this document will arrive before we depart, but I’m not necessarily expecting it to. We will give our mail key to our friend D who will be on the lookout for his documents and will Fedex to Nepal when they arrive. P might have to change his ticket if there is a delay in his documents, but at this point, we have to travel and hope for the best.

But the moral of the story is, USCIS can make you want to tear your hair out, but sometimes things actually work out. K-k-k-k-k-k-Kathmandu, here I come!

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6 responses to “The Ups and Downs of USCIS

  1. Hey awesome…we’ll be there from the 30th to the 15th. Are you flying Qatar? They just had a 3 day sale, and we got our tickets for about $1500 (on sale from $2000).

    • We must have missed the sale through Qatar. I love Qatar Airways, but the cheapest tickets we found were through Gulf Air with quite a few stops :(

      • I hear Gulf Air is pretty good too! I hope you get to stop over at some interesting places.
        Pretty cool that we’re gonna be there at the same time!

  2. Happy for you guys! Have a great trip!

  3. Bon voyag !!! Have a wonderful dashain…I am sure you will have lots of fun going for tika to all the relative houses.Wish we were so lucky to be home during Dashain too…

  4. Just went through a similar and terrible situation with USCIS. After 2 years of applications and marriage approvals, and dealing with bad lawyers, we finally got VJ his green card. That is why we actually went to KTM was for his green card interview. So grateful it is all over. It is amazing how much control complete strangers have in your life when it comes to dealing with immigration. Have a great trip, tell Bouda and Swayambou I say hello.

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